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Thursday, April 11

Tuesday, April 24

  1. page Literacy Forum edited ... 7) Jennifer Nance An Integrated Reading and Writing Class for First-year Writing 8) Elizabe…
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    7) Jennifer Nance
    An Integrated Reading and Writing Class for First-year Writing
    8) ElizabethElizabeth- Using Children's Literature for ESL -
    9) KristenKristen- Consolidation of Developmental Writing Courses
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    5:45 pm
  2. page Literacy Forum edited ... 7) Jennifer Nance An Integrated Reading and Writing Class for First-year Writing 8) Elizabe…
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    7) Jennifer Nance
    An Integrated Reading and Writing Class for First-year Writing
    8) Elizabeth
    9) Kristen

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  3. page Literacy Forum edited Date Name Topic 4/17 Ann-Marie Richardson High School Writing Center Mary Bowers Mid…
    Date Name Topic
    4/17
    Ann-Marie
    Richardson
    High School Writing Center
    Mary Bowers
    Middle School Writing Laboratory
    Holly Kuhnle
    College Writing Lab_ Adaptations for Hearing Impaired
    Aylen Rounds
    Engl 596: Raising Instructor Awareness
    Kim Ballenger
    Resource for Academic Identity Profile
    Becky Morrison
    Articulation of Engl 120-121
    Robin4/24
    1) Robin
    Seybold
    Professional Development in Peer Review
    Dawn2) Dawn Trueblood
    Better Peer Review in the Classroom
    4/24
    Theresa
    3) Theresa Dark
    Digital Literacy in a Communication Class
    Vickie4) Vickie McNiff
    Electronic Portfolios for Summative Assessment
    Kristin5) Kristin Kriesch
    Visual and Print Literacy in High School Language Arts
    Goldie6) Goldie Gibson
    A Celebration of Martin Luther King Day with Grades 6-12 at EMU
    Jennifer7) Jennifer Nance
    An Integrated Reading and Writing Class for First-year Writing
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  4. page Robin D Seybold edited ... Robin, 11, HALR ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy Robin, 12, HALR ch. 17, Literacy Demands of …
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    Robin, 11, HALR ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy
    Robin, 12, HALR ch. 17, Literacy Demands of Entering University
    Robin, Responses to verbafacture wikis
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  5. page Robin, Responses to verbafacture wikis edited Wiki Responses Journal 1. wk of Jan. 30: **Robin1963**just now Hi Dawn! No wonder your comments …
    Wiki Responses Journal
    1. wk of Jan. 30: **Robin1963**just now
    Hi Dawn! No wonder your comments about Friere sounded familiar, he and Gee both have this "marginalizing" idea going on, Friere involving gender and Gee involving money. Just as you point out men can be marginalized as well as women and that women are not quite as marginalized as in earlier decades, I took issue with Gee in that social manners, including speaking, can be adopted regardless of income and that the "perfect" diction & syntax is no longer specific to the wealthy - as most of our rich and (in-)famous can attest. Sometimes it seems to me these scholars dig up any old relic topic just to reinvent some action. I guess there may still exist some residual gender bias - but not significantly so that genuine barriers exist - women are all over academia; if anything, it is the positions of power that are slowly, slowly, catching up. I liked your observation that men are granted status of mobility.
    2. wk of Feb. 6: Ann Marie’s blog:
    I totally agree the multitude of literacies is bewildering! The way you tied digital literacy with all its offshoots to multiple intelligences and all its offshoots does help contain the whole idea, but I wonder if there will be a limit to how many versions of digital literacies are to be coped with or if the idea will expand weekly?
    In the classroom, I would like to select a few literacy intelligences to become proficient in that will provide the most bang for my instructional buck - a few multi-purposed features I can use across multiple lesson-situations, and ones that will also be of most practical use to students outside the classroom, like for functioning within their government. My difficulty now seems to lie in which one of hundreds of digitial literacies to select to become proficient at (relatively easily and quickly). I don't even think I can make that choice at this time as I suspect I'm looking only at the part of the iceberg that is above water level!
    3. wk of Feb. 6: Theresa Dark’s blog:
    Hi Theresa,
    I also find it amusing that no two author scholars can agree on a single word meaning - if they ran the world nothing would get finished. I'm not sure there is a wide disparity between Yagelski's view of social writing and Ivanic/Clark's view of writing practice. Had Yagelski delved deeper into what he meant by writing in harmony with earth it may loosely jive with what I. & C. describe as the social nature of writing. Though, I don't think they really go too deeply into this aspect either, it feels to me more of a sidebar that leads into the meat of their objective: their proposed alternative practice differing from linear models.
    I. & C. spend a lot of time comparing the differing elements of their perspective to those of previous chaotic linear writing processes, and I think Yagelski would agree there is an unavoidable process of writing whether determined or indeterminate.
    The chart is rather overwhelming, but, I think interesting. It responds to the ebb and flow nature of writing and helps to visualize something very difficult to explain. What I have difficulty with is the absence of methodology to instruction or assessment. Yes, it would be lovely and (maybe, maybe not) ideal if writing happened by natural process in social harmony, but really folks, circumstances of writing include purposeful writing more frequently than personal pleasure writing - which I should think would little require formal instruction. If writing scholars are circling the idea that instruction should be based on reality, I agree, but lets get a little closer to reality.
    4. wk of Feb. 13: Dawn Trueblood’s blog.
    Whew, for a minute I thought I might not find anyone responding to the New London Group piece! Idealistic - I wrote it reminded me of so many school mission statements, lovely, but really? At the end of mine I too wrote that changes will have to involve those outside education and most relevantly, students themselves. I also mention the noble, yet overwhelming responsibility, of placing these changes onto teachers to implement: who said (?), "You can't please all the people all the time" (No, not Mae West).
    I do like that they offer suggestions along with theory - so often it's just the theory, leaving me with the "great, now what"? I am interested in what curriculum development program the International Multiliteracies Project comes up with, but I probably won't unpack the rest of this article with "budding enthusiasm".
    I also like the new words (in spite of getting tired of too-much-info/words): glass ceiling has always sounded "pretty" (even though I know it's a "bad") still, glass slippers would be pretty, and so are skylights. "Conversationalization" I thought was a little over the top (I think sometimes "things" get made-up that don't necessarily need to be). Lifeworlds I leaves me ambiguous, if there can be valid grounds (meaning) for making it up - then it needs to be; the article does provide some meaning so I'm leaning 70/30 towards favoring "lifeworlds" (still sounds a little pretentious).
    5. wk of March 5: Becky Morrison’s blog.
    Becky, you mention being amazed at how much “college level” literacy is gained outside of college and (as Yancey discusses) students gaining college literacy while in high school.
    I guess I’ve seen it both ways, literacy-prepared and under-prepared high school students entering college. I do know there is a stronger focus in high school to prepare students for college in all content areas, especially in the ELA area, and that most schools offer additional courses and programs targeting college preparation literacies and behaviors.
    I believe the level of preparation as always, rests in the hands of the students. If resources, instruction, and practices are engaged critically by students and validly internalized, they will be better prepared for college literacy than their peers who do not take advantage of offered resources, do not engage with instruction, and do not internalize their learning and practice.
    I think also, many high school students do not seriously consider attending college until, belatedly, in their senior year, or a year or two after graduation, they reconsider and enroll; under-prepared. This introduces a new topic of remedial college courses or the community college as the new high school. I certainly do see community college as a bridge between high school and universities, as they have long offered programs that transfer, and, I think, are sensitive to the literacy transformation that often needs to take place for new students who have not always been academically minded.
    6. wk of March 5: Aylen’s blog.
    Aylen, you mention how the five demands of college literacy make sense for college and for life in general and ask why it is these skills are not prioritized in high school classes. These demands, readiness standards, core content, mission statement objectives, or whatever pop name refers to these expectations (still a rose) are a part of high school disciplines; more so the last 10 years or so I guess than in earlier decades.
    Most high schools offer college preparation programs, advance placement courses, dual enrollment to local community colleges, and the high school ELA content is reflective of both Genre, Creative, Life Applicable, and taught by methods of process-based portfolio, publishing for public reading and are assessed using multi-fold techniques. The Common Core standards embody expert quality, real world applications, media proficiency, cross-genre and cross-cultural text variety, and the curriculum implemented, especially ELA, does facilitate high engagement. Lecture, a commonly employed strategy of college delivery, is the least employed strategy in high school settings. K-12 classrooms are very active and collaborative. School districts target, for their students, college preparation development and responsible academic behaviors in their school programs.
    Nevertheless, the horse can only be led to water. Unlike college students who are present by choice, high school students can be resistant to academics if they don’t view that path as their future. Possibly too, the age gap between 17 and 19 might be bigger than 2 mere years.
    I believe the level of preparation as always, rests in the hands of the students. If resources, instruction, and practices are engaged critically by students and validly internalized, they will be better prepared for college literacy than their cognitively un-prepared peers who do not take advantage of offered resources, do not engage with instruction, and do not internalize their learning and practice. Some say an equally influential factor is students' home environments, however, I'm not sure I agree to an equally influential factor, I lean more towards a personal motivation factor as a precursor to successful freshman college experience.
    I think also, many high school students do not seriously consider attending college until, belatedly, in their senior year, or a year or two after graduation, they reconsider and enroll; under-prepared. This introduces a new topic of remedial college courses or the community college as the new high school. I certainly do see community college as a bridge between high school and universities, as they have long offered programs that transfer, and, I think, are sensitive to the literacy transformation that often needs to take place for new students who have not always been academically inclined.
    7 & 8. wk of March 12:

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  6. page Robin D Seybold edited ... Robin, 9, HALR ch. 10, Academic Purpose Robin, 10, HALR ch. 15, Tracking and Ability Grouping…
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    Robin, 9, HALR ch. 10, Academic Purpose
    Robin, 10, HALR ch. 15, Tracking and Ability Grouping
    Robin, 11, HALR ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy
    Robin, 12, HALR ch. 17, Literacy Demands of Entering University

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  7. page Robin, 12, HALR ch. 17, Literacy Demands of Entering University edited Robin 12, ch. 17, Literacy Demands of Entering the University The college application essay stude…
    Robin 12, ch. 17, Literacy Demands of Entering the University
    The college application essay students typically write that is a personal essay that is well-edited and coherent, entails both risk and relaxation. Paley (260) calls this situation a rhetorical paradox, and note the differences between successful and unsuccessful writers are screened using a read-aloud protocol when essays are reviewed, are based less on stated criteria, and more on an “emotional literacy”. With the admonition to “relax” framing the essay task, students could believe formal properties do not matter – when in fact, correctness and formality are both expected and rewarded by admissions officers. I must confess I did not know this subterfuge, I simply did not believe they would really expect (or desire) for me to “relax” and write incorrectly; though, a student, when relaxing, would still not be expected to write purposely incorrectly.
    The next notable issue (pg 261) involves the placement essay, judged by criteria both stated and hidden. The stated includes clear topics, critical understanding, insightful response, explores in depth, coherent, supported with apt reasons and well-chosen examples, effect, fluent, syntactic variety, and clear command, free from errors. However, what the hidden criteria conceal is probably the weightier factors when Admissions makes their determination. Higher scores contain canonical literary references, dates of important historical events and authors of famous quotations. What is being evaluated are the social identities constructed in student texts. I think also it is the level of dispositions utilized by students and their literacy identity that is spoken of in chapter 7, Fostering Engaged Academic Literacy.
    The third identifying marker for student literacy when entering college is the directed self-placement, when students decide for themselves which first-year composition course is appropriate, indicates intrapersonal composing knowledge. The more self-aware a student is of their strengths and weaknesses, and their ability to gauge what will be most effective to their development suggest other dimensions required for success. Other literacy proficiencies students will need are writing to unarticulated demands and assessing accurately their writing strengths in the institution’s context. The authors move forward to examining five postsecondary literacy themes: Processes and novice-ship, Sources and evaluation of information, Critical thinking, Reflective practice, and New texts, new discourses. The more the high school teacher can incorporate these scholarly practices the better prepared college-bound students will be. I find it interesting this was all unknown to me until after completing a BA and an MAE. However, now that I do, I feel it my responsibility as a high school teacher to promote these self-directed awareness and literacy dispositions/identities.

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  8. page Robin, 11, HALR ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy edited Robin 11, Ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy The focus on affective and identity issues is the top…
    Robin 11, Ch. 7, Engaged Academic Literacy
    The focus on affective and identity issues is the topic that riveted my attention in this chapter. With a special education teaching background, I am accustomed more to reluctant and resistant readers than any other kind. I have also had opportunities of being in a variety of classrooms and observed a variety of teaching methodology – some that encouraged the dispositions that develop resilient literacy identities, and some that reinforce the passive stance of prescribed procedures.
    The two discussions I most enjoyed were on pages 100 & 101 concerning Developing Dispositions for Engagement in Academic Tasks. The objective is to reach the student; without the student buy-in, nothing will change. Student attitudes and ideas of themselves is what we need to influence and the authors do a nice job of describing the directions those attitudes need to pivoted towards. Incidentally, it is my belief that it is the relationship of respect that is nurtured by the teacher to the student that will create the foundation for the student to reciprocate an attitude of respect for the teacher, and a faith in the teacher’s wanting what is best for them, that will allow the student to be influenced into altering their self-perceptions and academic dispositions.
    Fixed negative identity is a powerful barrier as is the self-consciousness and sensitivity to negative peer group perceptions; likewise establishing and enforcing classroom climates of scholarly integrity and positive peer interactions/response activities can be an effective method of supporting all students. The characteristics of curiosity, tolerance for ambiguity, and the expectation one should construct understanding rather than passively carrying out prescribed procedures, are features not always encouraged as they ought to be in classrooms and I think this is why so often young people are not cognizant of their potential to construct understanding – when habits of independent thinking are not a naturalized condition, students become ritualized learners across the grades, through the years, and sometimes reach graduation without taking control and agency for their own learning.
    Confidence in their ability and in the value of persistence is under-rated by students, they give up quickly and easily especially under conditions of prescriptive ritualized learning. An approach of intervening with a code-breaking strategy to analyze unfamiliar text, would embed the notion they are in control, that successful readers persist to understand and connect concepts for their own learning; not to please another, or to respond to one question for the moment.
    I also really liked, and wish it had been longer, the section on page 105 that discusses Developing Resilient Literacy Identities. The authors speak further of transforming the identities of non-readers that are often created through negative school experiences – into capable readers. Adolescence is a time of self-exploration as they suggest, and the classroom is a great context for them to envision who they are or may become, and through extension to reengage as readers. Lave and Wenger, 1991, describe the process of identity formation as a negotiation of “participative experiences” and social interpretations of experiences, and through this negotiation, construct their identities. When teachers provide consistent support for students to try new ways of acting, thinking, and interacting, there are significant shifts in academic identity of the course of a year. This practice speaks exactly to my earlier assertion of classroom practice that supports trust and exploration; I am pleasantly surprised positive results can undo earlier damage in such a relatively short time.

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Monday, April 23

  1. page Elizabeth Shukri Baran-Bouladian edited ... Response to Goldie's on-Let's stop teaching writing. Response to Teresa's Literacy Over the l…
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    Response to Goldie's on-Let's stop teaching writing.
    Response to Teresa's Literacy Over the last few weeks
    Elizabeth 04-23-12 response to Goldie's April 17 update
    Elizabeth Baran-Bouladian
    Professor Tucker
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